Osteoporosis 46-60 Years

Staying healthy as we age means keeping bones strong. Osteoporosis is a disease in which bones become fragile and more likely to break. If not prevented or if left untreated, osteoporosis can progress painlessly until a bone breaks. These broken bones, also known as fractures, occur typically in the hip, spine and wrist.

For women with risk factors for osteoporosis, we offer on-site heel scans to help identify signs of the condition. If additional testing is warranted following a heel scan, we can perform a central (full-body) bone densitometer scan to better understand your condition

If you already have osteoporosis, or know you’re at risk, you can live actively and comfortably by seeking proper medical care and making some adjustments to your lifestyle. Your physician may prescribe a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D, a regular program of weight-bearing exercise and medical treatment.

Dr. Goldstein discusses osteoporosis:

Osteoporosis is a complex disease, and not all of its causes are known, but the results are bones that are more fragile and more prone to break. However, when certain risk factors are present, your likelihood of developing osteoporosis is increased. Therefore it is important to determine your risk of developing osteoporosis and take action to prevent it now. Osteoporosis is preventable if bone loss is detected early.

  • Are you a postmenopausal woman, or have you had an early or surgically-induced menopause?
  • Do you have a small, thin frame and/or are you Caucasian or Asian?
  • Do you have a family history of osteoporosis?
  • Have you had a non-traumatic bone fracture as an adult?
  • Have you taken high doses of thyroid medication or used glucocorticoids (e.g. prednisone) for more than six months?
  • Have you taken, or are you taking, immunosuppressive medications or chemotherapy to treat cancer?
  • Is your diet low in dairy products and other sources of calcium?
  • Are you physically inactive?
  • Do you smoke or drink alcohol in excess?

The more times you answer “yes,” the greater your risk for developing osteoporosis.


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